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8th grade grade Louisiana History weekly agenda

Weekly Agenda Mar. 18- 22

Monday:

  1. Bell ringer
  2. Read in SRB about Effects on America and Louisiana after WWII
  3. Introduce the Civil Rights Era
  4. Write the words Civil Rights on the board and read or project the following definition: a. The rights of citizens to political and social freedom and equality. 3. Conduct a brief discussion about the definition of Civil Rights. Possible questions: a. How were African-Americans denied their Civil Rights? b. How had the Louisiana government prevented African-Americans from changing laws that denied their Civil Rights?
  5. Provide students access to Jim Crow in Louisiana by Nikki Brown from knowlouisiana.org Encyclopedia of Louisiana. Provide students with a copy of the Fight for Civil Rights Timeline. Direct students to independently read the first 3 paragraphs of the section titled “Civil Rights Movement Builds” complete boxes 1 - 3 of the Fight for Civil Rights Timeline. Box 1 should cover the NAACP in Louisiana, box 2 should cover A.P. Tureaud fighting for equal pay for all teachers, and box 3 should cover African-Americans returning from World War II.

Tuesday:

  1. Bell ringer
  2. Provide students access to Baton Rouge Bus Boycott by Christine Melton from knowlouisiana.org Encyclopedia of Louisiana. Direct students to independently read the first paragraph of the document and complete box 4 of the Fight for Civil Rights Timeline about the Baton Rouge Bus Boycott.
  3. Direct students to read the rest of Baton Rouge Bus Boycott as a group.  Provide the students access to: a. Community Organized Free Ride by Ernest Ritchie from knowlouisiana.org Encyclopedia of Louisiana b. Rev. T. J. Jemison with Martin Luther King, Jr. by Ernest Ritchie from knowlouisiana.org Encyclopedia of Louisiana c. Baton Rouge Bus Stop by Ernest Ritchie from knowlouisiana.org Encyclopedia of Louisiana d. The Free Ride System by Ernest Ritchie from knowlouisiana.org Encyclopedia of Louisiana
  4. Have each group analyze the four photographs of the Baton Rouge Bus Boycott. As needed, provide students with questions similar to the observation questions from the Library of Congress’ Analyzing Photographs & Prints have the each group to write down what they observe about the photographs. Conduct a discussion about the legacy of the Baton Rouge Bus Boycott. Encourage students to use the conversation stems during the discussion and provide evidence from the documents and outside knowledge to support their answers. Possible questions: a. What psychological effects did segregation on buses have on African Americans? b. Why is a boycott an effective forms of protest? c. How did some white Louisianians react to this protest? What does this tell you about future protests in Louisiana during the Civil Rights Era? d. In your opinion, was the Baton Rouge Bus Boycott effective as it could have been? Why or Why not? e. How did the legacy of the Baton Rouge Bus Boycott effect the entire Civil Rights Movement?

Wednesday:

  1. Bell ringer
  2. Provide students with a copy of Brown v. Board of Education (1954, 1955) from History - Brown v. Board of Education.
  3.  Have students independently read the excerpt and record details in box 5 of Fight for Civil Rights Timeline handout about the Supreme Court Case of Brown v. Board of Education. 
  4. Provide students with access to New Orleans School Crisis by Nikki Brown from knowlouisiana.org. Have students independently read the “The Crisis in New Orleans Begins” section and record details about Louisiana’s governor Jimmie Davis fighting to stop integration of schools in box 6 and details about the first African-American children to attend integrated schools in New Orleans box 7 of their Fight for Civil Rights Timeline handout.
  5. Provide students with access to: a. Segregation Bills Voted in Louisiana from The Chicago Tribune, Nov. 7, 1960 b. Ruby Bridges Enters School from knowlouisiana.org c. Close Our Schools? from knowlouisiana.org d. Teens Protest Integration from knowlouisiana.org e. Demonstrators at William Frantz Elementary School from knowlouisiana.org f. Crowd Stopped Near School Board Office from knowlouisiana.org
  6.  Divide the class into small groups using an established classroom routine. Have students analyze the primary sources about school integration in New Orleans. As needed, provide  How to Navigate This Document 300 students with questions similar to the observation questions from the Library of Congress’ Analyzing Photographs & Prints have the each group to write down what they observe about the photographs.
  7. Conduct a Socratic seminar in response to the question: What is legacy of Jim Crow Laws on the Civil Rights Movement in Louisiana? Encourage students to use the conversation stems during the discussion and provide evidence from the documents and outside knowledge to support their answers. Possible guiding questions: a. How has Jim Crow Laws affected the cultural legacy of Louisiana? b. What was the psychological impact of Jim Crow Laws on some white people during the Civil Rights Era? c. How did the Civil Rights Movement affect African-Americans view of Jim Crow Laws?

Thursday:

  1. Bell Ringer
  2. Provide students with access to Key provisions of Civil Rights Act of 1964 from the Richmond Times-Dispatch.
  3. Have students independently read the document and record details about the major implications of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in box 8 of the Fight for Civil Rights Timeline handout.
  4. Provide students with access to Voting Rights Act of 1965 from the History of Federal Voting Rights Laws. Have students independently read paragraphs 3 and 4 of the first section of the document and record details about the major implications of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in box 9 of the Fight for Civil Rights Timeline handout. 

Friday:

  1. Bell ringer
  2. Direct students to write a response explaining how African-Americans changed Louisiana culturally and politically during the Civil Rights Movement. Students should be given a copy of the LEAP Assessment Social Studies Extended Response Rubric to reference as they are writing.

 

 

 

Monday:

  1. Bellringer
  2.  

Tuesday:

  1. Bellringer
  2.  

Wednesday:

  1. Bell ringer
  2.  

Thursday:

  1. Bell Ringer
  2.  

Friday:

  1. Bell ringer
  2.